Online registration for fall 2021 will open August 2 at 9 a.m. EST. An email with additional information has been sent to all current members.


Fall 2021

All Fall 2021 LLARC courses will be conducted via Zoom.

Most study groups meet for 10 weeks, although several meet for five weeks. Please note the specific meeting dates given for each group.

Study groups are typically "led" rather than "taught" - all by volunteers. Most use a seminar format, emphasizing discussion, usually with preparatory reading. There are variables, however, such as the amount and nature of weekly preparation, the opportunity or expectation for group members to give presentations, and the extent to which material is presented by the leader. Please read descriptions carefully for these details. Also note costs for materials and/or texts, which students should buy independently.

Details

Study groups fill up fast! Register as soon as you can after registration opens for the best chance of getting into the study groups you want.

  1. Who may join? LLARC welcomes mature men and women of all faiths and backgrounds.
  2. Choose from two levels of participation:
    1. Basic annual membership, including the Lunch, Listen and Learn program
    2. Basic annual membership plus enrollment for the current semester in one or more study groups.
  3. You must be a member to enroll in courses and enjoy other benefits of membership. The membership fee is annual and is valid from September 1, 2021 to August 31, 2022.
  4. The flat tuition rate covers all your study groups for the semester. Space is limited in all classes, however, so enrollment is not guaranteed. (Also, a study group may be cancelled if enrollment is insufficient.) We strongly encourage you to make alternate selections in case your top choices are filled. You may select up to four study groups. If a study group is filled, you will be placed on a waiting list.
  5. The Regis Hub will be used to access registration information. Members will receive an email from Regis College Information Technology with details regarding their Regis credentials (student ID and Regis email). Additional information regarding accessing the Regis Hub is also forthcoming.
  6. After registering, students will receive further instructions about the payment process for the fall.
  7. Study group leaders will communicate any preparation necessary for the first class meeting.
  8. Additional costs. You are responsible for the cost of books and other materials.

3231 Creative Writing for Fun - CLOSED

Study Group Leader: Virginia Slep

Session Length: 10 weeks

Day and Time: Mondays, 9:15 a.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 20

End Date: December 6

No Class: October 11 (Columbus Day), November 22 (Thanksgiving Week)

Course Description: In this writing-for-fun group, the creative talents of participants will be encouraged by their peers. Members are encouraged to write in any genre: memoir, fiction, non-fiction, poetry, essay or play. Participants are given time each week to share their writing with classmates. This is a light-hearted, supportive, welcoming group whose members enjoy writing for the fun of it. Enrollment is limited to 10 people.

Enrollment Note: No spaces are available for fall 2021. Members may still select the class and will be added to a waitlist.

Leader: Virginia Slep holds a BA and an MA in English, and taught high school English for 35 years before her retirement. She has been teaching this writing class at LLARC since 2008. She writes a regular column for the North Reading Transcript. Virginia has a PhD in clinical hypnosis, and has a private practice in Wayland.

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3235 The Rise of The Third Reich

Study Group Leader: Bernie Shuster

Session Length: 10 weeks

Day and Time: Mondays, 9:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 20

End Date: December 6

No Class: October 11 (Columbus Day), November 22 (Thanksgiving Week)

Course Description: In 1933 a dictatorial state was imposed upon the ruins of Weimar republic. A coalition of the discontented were able to subvert Germany's democratic institutions. Hitler's manipulative charisma required massive dissatisfaction and resentment to be exploited. Nazim found convenient scapegoats in historic anti-Semitism, the shame of a post WWII peace, and a weak unstable government alien to the German past.

Required Reading: The Coming of the Third Reich by Richard J. Evans (ISBN-13: 978-1594200045)

Leader: Bernie Shuster was a history major in undergraduate school where he received a BA degree. He then earned an LLD degree at Boston University School of Law. Bernie practiced law as a partner in a Boston law firm. He later was the founder and CEO of a financial services company. He was a member of Harvard Institute for Learning in Retirement for several years and has led over forty classes at LLARC.

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3236 Wildflowers: Women Surviving and Thriving on the American Frontier, 1820-1890 - CLOSED

Study Group Leader: Mary Nowak

Session Length: 10 weeks

Day and Time: Mondays, 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 20

End Date: December 6

No Class: October 11 (Columbus Day), November 22 (Thanksgiving Week)

Course Description: You may have read Little House on the Prairie… but how much more do we know about these Pioneer women and their concerns, struggles, and triumphs? By studying their diaries, letters, journals, oral histories and remembrances, we can catch glimpses of their lives. When the Man of the House (father, brother, or husband) declared it was time to move West, a woman had to pack up household, children, pets and go. For some this meant one huge move to a new and unknown place; for others this happened again and again as men searched for gold and silver or just steady employment. These women coped with dangers, diseases, deaths, storms, grueling travel on foot and in covered wagons, wild animals and sometimes furious opposition from local tribes or other bands of settlers.

Required Reading: The study group leader will share reading materials ahead of time.

Leader: Mary Nowak has a BA and MA in American history from Boston University. She taught American history and U.S. and world geography in Brookline. She has led several study groups for LLARC on three of her favorite subjects: women’s history, the roles of women on both sides of the Civil War, women and children in the Labor Movement, and the Japanese Internment by and within the U.S. during WWII.

Enrollment Note: No spaces are available for fall 2021. Members may still select the class and will be added to a waitlist.

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3232 More and More Mysteries

Study Group Leader: Karen Mallozzi

Session Length: 10 weeks

Day and Time: Mondays, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 27

End Date: December 13

No Class: September 20 (SGL Commitment), October 11 (Columbus Day), November 22 (Thanksgiving Week)

Course Description: We will continue our exploration of the genre mystery fiction. The group reads one book per week with plenty of time to read ahead and take notes before sessions start. Participants are encouraged to use the library system, online sites, or e-readers to access books. Some titles may be on audio. Classes are discussion based with some starter questions emailed weekly before class meets.

Required Reading: These are the books we will share in order: The Nantucket Diet Murders by Virginia Rich, The Postscript Murders by Elly Griffiths, The Sentence is Death by Anthony Horowitz, The Franchise Affair by Josephine Tey, Truth Be Told by Hank Phillippi Ryan, Never-Ending Snake by Aimee Thurlo, A is for Alibi by Sue Grafton, Grave Expectations by Heather Redmond, Murder and the First Lady by Elliot Roosevelt, Homicide in the House by Colleen Shogan.

Leader: Karen is pleased to be continuing the Mystery Book sessions. She holds a BA from the University of RI 1981, and an MA in religious studies from Andover-Newton Theological School 2012. Along with her gardening, Karen reads constantly and volunteers at the Natick Food Pantry and at Elm Bank.

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3242 Tapping Reeve, The Litchfield Law School, and the Development of the Legal Profession in Early America - CANCELLED

This class has been cancelled for the fall. We are looking forward to offering it again when we are back on campus.

If you had indicated that you wished to enroll in this class, and would like to select another class, please email LLARC Program Director, Michele Almeida at michele.almeida@regiscollege.edu.

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3237 Current Events

Study Group Leader: Muriel Stern Riseman

Session Length: 10 weeks

Day and Time: Tuesdays, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 21

End Date: November 30

No Class: November 23 (Thanksgiving Week)

Course Description: Are you a person who is interested in world events and likes to have a conversation and exchange ideas about them? Do you want to have a place to share your opinions and thoughts about topics in the news? If so, we have a class for you! Through a facilitated discussion, classmates express their ideas about recent happenings, while we listen, learn, and understand the basis for their sentiments. Class members are encouraged to give one short presentation during the semester, about a topic of interest to him/her. Usually, the talks are at the beginning of the class, while at the end of each class, we discuss recent events that have occurred during the previous week, day, or even hour!

Required Reading: None

Leader: Muriel Stern Riseman is a retired high school counselor who, while working, particularly enjoyed facilitating discussions between youth and adults. After retirement, Muriel continued this interest by leading community support groups. However, Muriel is also a major "news junkie" and likes to absorb as much information as she can about what is happening in the world, share her perceptions, and hear/understand other points of view. Muriel has facilitated current events classes at LLARC for about three years, and knows that we always have more news to explore.

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3238 The Movies’ Take on the Issues 2 - CLOSED

Student Group Leader: Ronna Frick

Session Length: 10 weeks

Day and Time: Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 21

End Date: November 30

No Class: November 23 (Thanksgiving Week)

Course Description: In this second iteration of The Movies’ Take on the Issues, we will again look at what happens when the movies decide to explore serious issues. We will continue our look at race, and then gender, immigration, rape, and the environment, exploring how the movies present the topic and what conclusions, if any, are drawn—or that we can draw about what the movie is actually saying about the issue. Is the film an honest exploration or a “whitewash”? How does the cultural milieu of the time the film was made influence its depiction of the issue? How do race, gender, and class play into the depiction of what is at stake? How does the film’s genre (i.e. a comedy vs. drama, for example) change its depiction and its impact? How is the film an articulation of American society and its values? We will view two films on each topic. Each week before we view the film, I will send out a guide to the film. The films will be streamed on Zoom in the first part of the class, and then after a short break we will discuss the film (on Zoom) through the lens of the questions listed above and on the study guide.

The topics and films we will discuss are: Race: Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom and Fruitvale Station; Gender: The Crying Game and Boys Don’t Cry; Immigration: The Visitor and Moscow on the Hudson; Rape: The Accused and Promising Young Woman; and Environment: The China Syndrome and Erin Brokovitch. (Warning: some of the topics and films deal with difficult and controversial material.) These topics and titles are subject to change.

Required Reading: Weekly study guide provided by the group leader.

Leader: Ronna Frick retired after teaching high school English for over forty years, the last nine also serving as English department head at Wellesley High School. Having taught LLARC courses on Jane Austen, The Bible as literature, comedy and tragedy, Hollywood film genres, Hollywood film directors, great film actors and actresses, and others, she looks forward to another meaningful and fun experience with other lifelong learners in this course, too.

Enrollment Note: No spaces are available for fall 2021. Members may still select the class and will be added to a waitlist.

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3251 Two for the Road

Study Group Leader: Brooks Goddard

Session Length: Five weeks

Day and Time: Tuesdays, 9:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 21

End Date: October 19

Course Description: The title is a bit tongue-in-cheek, but it does refer to two best-selling novels written in the past three years in which the central characters leave home and go on the road looking for greater fulfillment. Dare’s book starts in rural Nigeria and ends up in the big city of Lagos, Nigeria. Bennett starts her characters in rural southern Louisiana before one sister goes to LA and the other stays behind. Both stories are very engaging. Reading will average 100 pages per week. Please read the first 26 chapters in Louding for the first session.

Required Reading: The Girl with the Louding Voice by Abi Dare and The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett

Leader: Brooks Goddard has led many discussions on a variety of topics at LLARC. He has had a 55-year career teaching all kinds of folks, young and older. He retired from Wellesley High School in 2000 as English department head emeritus. In 2017 he edited a book of teaching memories from East Africa called We Were Walimu Once and Young, which is available on Amazon.com.

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3239 From Brain to Mind

Study Group Leader: Jim McLaren

Session Length: 10 weeks

Day and Time: Tuesdays, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 21

End Date: November 30

No Class: November 23 (Thanksgiving Week)

Course Description: Starting with how single nerve cells function, we will see how these cells interconnect and build complex communication systems including brains. We will follow brains up the evolutionary ladder to our own. More than half the course will focus on the human brain, behavior, and ultimately consciousness. The ultimate question is brain vs. mind and whether there is a difference.

Required Reading: None, a bibliography of related materials will be provided

Leader: Jim McLaren has taught four previous courses at LLARC. He is a retired high school science teacher and department chair. Most of his teaching has focused on biology, but he has had a life-long interest in amateur astronomy.

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3240 History in Movies

Study Group Leader: Ron Greenwald

Session Length: 10 weeks

Day and Time: Tuesdays, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 21

End Date: December 7

No Class: November 23 (Thanksgiving Week)

Course Description: Participants will watch a total of ten movies. These movies will focus on two historical topics: 1) Depression/Labor and 2) Decolonization. Participants will be expected to view the films prior to the class. Class time will be spent discussing each film in its own right, in addition to how it relates to the overarching theme.

Required Viewing:

Films to focus on Depression/Labor:

  • Grapes of Wrath
    The trials and agonies of a family of “Okies leaving the “Dust Bowl” to California
  • Sounder
    The story of a Black family during the Depression
  • How Green was my Valley
    The story of a Welsh Coal Miner family
  • North Country
    One woman’s fight to allow women into a union in Minnesota’s Iron Ridge
  • On the Waterfront
    The destruction of a corrupt union on the New York waterfront

Films to focus on Decolonization:

  • Algiers
    Algerian independence from France
  • Viceroy’s House
    The story of Mountbatten, the last Viceroy of India, who oversaw the transition to independence and the partition of India into Pakistan and India
  • Cast A Giant Shadow
    The story of an American Jewish general who commanded Israeli forces in the 1948 Water of Independence
  • The Wind that Shakes the Barley and Michael Collins
    These to movies examine the Irish Independence; two conflicting views of Ireland 1916-1920 and her fight for independence.

Note: We take the last fifteen minutes of the last week for the class to criticize the leaders choice of movies and the sequence in which they were presented.

Note: All the movies can be rented for either $2 or $3 each.

Leader: Ron Greenwald holds three graduate degrees in history and has taught history at three Greater Boston Colleges over 15 years. He teaches his courses in the Socratic method using only primary sources. He taught for LLARC during fall 2020, winter intersession of 2021, and spring 2021.

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3241 Dante's Inferno - CANCELLED

This class has been cancelled for the fall. We are looking forward to offering it again when we are back on campus.

If you had indicated that you wished to enroll in this class, and would like to select another class, please email LLARC Program Director, Michele Almeida at michele.almeida@regiscollege.edu.

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3244 Robert Moses: The Man and The Myth - CANCELLED

This class has been cancelled for the fall. We are looking forward to offering it again when we are back on campus.

If you had indicated that you wished to enroll in this class, and would like to select another class, please email LLARC Program Director, Michele Almeida at michele.almeida@regiscollege.edu.

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3245 Populating the Americas: A Scientific Detective Story

Study Group Leader: Frank Villa

Session Length: 10 weeks

Day and Time: Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 22

End Date: December 8

No Class: October 27 (group leader personal commitment), November 24 (Thanksgiving)

Course Description: When Europeans “discovered” America in the 15th century, they failed to realize that there already existed a thriving and diverse culture that included agricultural innovations crucial to feeding the world’s population today, and large cities, the rival in size and culture to anything Europe had to offer. The story of how the earliest indigenous settlers populated this world is a scientific detective story with many unanswered questions. The story continues to unfold as uncovered by a range of scientific disciplines from geology to astronomy, from chemistry to climatology. Join us for an adventure in science, mystery, and discovery as we explore this remarkable tale together.

Required Reading: All materials will be provided by the study group leader.

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3233 The Short Story

Study Group Leader: Pam Kyrka

Session Length: Five weeks

Day and Time: Wednesdays, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 22

End Date: October 20

Course Description: What constitutes a short story, setting it apart from a novel? A novella? This five-week course will explore the short story, examining the elements that are akin to this genre as well as reading and discussing some excellent, thought-provoking modern fiction. We will read and discuss 2 stories during each class. Participants should purchase (it is in paperback) The Best American Short Stories 2020 edited by Curtis Sittenfeld. Short stories can be challenging. Why, we might ask, did the author start where he/she did? And why end sometimes without the resolution for which we readers might wish? We will explore these questions, among others. For anyone who took the course in the spring, we will be using the 2020 edition of Best American Short Stories but we will be reading different ones in that text. The 2021 edition is not available yet.

Required Reading: The Best American Short Stories 2020 edited by Curtis Sittenfeld

Leader: Pam Kyrka is a recently retired high school English teacher with years of experience teaching literature and writing in Lexington, Natick, and Mendon-Upton. She also writes children’s literature, including picture books and both middle grade and young adult fiction.

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3247 Foreign Choices

Study Group Leader: J. Adrian Zimmer

Session Length: Five weeks

Day and Time: Wednesdays, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 22

End Date: October 20

Course Description: One way to gain a better understanding of a foreign culture is to watch people making decisions in it. In "Foreign Choices" we will discuss decisions being made in five different foreign films. Chosen from mostly European cultures, these films require their protagonists to make life-changing decisions. Class discussions will emphasize those decisions in the context of their ambient cultures.

Required Reading: Light reading of reviews or blogs. The latter will describe a culture from a foreign resident’s point of view.

Leader: J Adrian Zimmer is a retired computer science professor who has led some film discussion groups at the Harvard Institute for Learning in Retirement and a math class for LLARC. His interest in foreign cultures stems from living in four countries on three continents.

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3248 The Beginnings of Judaism

Study Group Leader: Robert Orkand

Session Length: 10 weeks

Day and Time: Thursdays, 9:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 23

End Date: December 9

No Class: November 11 (Veterans’ Day), November 25 (Thanksgiving)

Course Description: How did Judaism develop from its biblical roots to the highly developed system we know today? What has changed - and what has remained constant? The answers to these questions are relevant to all faiths, as well as to anyone seeking to broaden their understanding of ancient history - a past that is inexorably linked to the present. This course explores the evolution of an ancient faith into a system of beliefs, practices, and laws recognizable today as Judaism.

Required Reading: None

Leader: Robert Orkand retired from the active rabbinate in 2013, followed by a move to the greater Boston area to be near his grandchildren. In retirement Robert has taught many adult learning courses, including for LLARC.

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3249 Constitutions and the Making of the Modern World

Study Group Leader: Jacob Miller

Session Length: Five weeks

Day and Time: Thursdays, 9:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: October 28

End Date: December 9

No Class: November 11 (Veterans’ Day), November 25 (Thanksgiving)

Course Description: Recently, citizens of the West have learned that they could not take democracy for granted. Democracy requires defining and limiting the rules and principles of governing authority. By the 20th Century, constitutions had come to be regarded a trademark of a modern state and the state of being modern. We will analyze the ideas, motivations, and activities of those involved in designing and championing constitutions. We will investigate the forces and undercut existing authorities, creating opportunities for constitutional writers. Some autocratic rulers wrote constitutions signaling their “modern status” to their people. Globalization led to constitution writing by the mid-19th Century.

Required Reading: None

Leader: Jack is a retired Engineer having taught several LLARC history classes including our 1787 Constitutional Convention and several presidents. Jack’s interest in American history focuses this class on 18th to 20th Century US and foreign constitution writers including how Globalization led to spreading ideas that were used to develop constitutions.

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3250 An American Portrait: A Nation in Its Art

Study Group Leader: Steve Kendall

Session Length: 10 weeks

Day and Time: Thursdays, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: September 23

End Date: December 9

No Class: November 11 (Veterans’ Day), November 25 (Thanksgiving)

Course Description: Beginning with the first shot fired on Lexington Green, the “face” of America has changed continually to this day. All the while, artists have created a portrait of the nation’s people, landscape, culture and issues. They have painted a picture of growth, beauty and opportunity seized — but also of conflict, poverty, and intolerance. In this course, you will experience the American story the way artists most often see it: not as a series of events, but as a people and a place. Join us as we discuss what makes great American art meaningful, poignant and appealing — and how it tells our own story.

Required Reading: None

Leader: Steve Kendall is the retired president of an advertising and public relations agency and the leader of more than 700 tours at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum and the Danforth Museum. He is a recipient of the LLARC Bernie Shuster Award for teaching excellence. This is the 13th term he has taught at LLARC.

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3243 Wise Aging

Study Group Leader: Sheila Wolfson

Session Length: Five weeks

Day and Time: Wednesdays, 9:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.

Course Type: Online via Zoom

Start Date: October 27

End Date: December 1

No Class: November 24 (Thanksgiving)

Course Description: Explore in a small group what it means to grow older in our society. This is an opportunity to reflect on and appreciate our lives as gifts of time. Each session includes study and discussion of traditional and contemporary texts, contemplative practice (mindfulness meditation) and reflective conversation to explore challenges, opportunities and wonder of aging. Some topics: life review, revitalizing healthy relationships, our bodies, and cultivating wellbeing with qualities such as gratitude and equanimity.

Required Reading: This course is based on the book Wise Aging: Living with Joy, Resilience and Spirit by Rabbi Rachel Cowan and Dr. Linda Thal. As this is a virtual class, the book is required in order to refer to and discuss particular readings.

Leader: Sheila Wolfson is a retired nutritionist and holistic health counselor. She has been a meditator since 1972. She was trained as a mindfulness meditation teacher and Wise Aging facilitator at the Institute for Jewish Spirituality. Sheila has been leading meditation groups for many years in various settings. She has taught her two LLARC courses, Wise Aging and Mindfulness Meditation in the past.

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