All LLARC Programs for the fall of 2020 will be held virtually.


Fall 2020

Most study groups meet for 10 weeks, mini courses meet for 5 or 6 weeks. Please note the specific meeting dates given for each course. All fall 2020 classes will be held virtually, unless specified otherwise. Study groups are typically "led" rather than "taught" — all by volunteers. Most use a seminar format, emphasizing discussion, usually with preparatory reading. There are variables, however, such as the amount and nature of weekly preparation, the opportunity or expectation for class members to give presentations, and the extent to which material is presented by the leader. Please read descriptions carefully for these details. Also note costs for materials provided (other than texts, which students should buy independently.)

Details

Classes fill up! Apply early for best chances of getting into the study groups you want. Enrollments continue thereafter on a first-come, first-served basis.

  1. Who may join. LLARC welcomes mature men and women of all faiths and backgrounds.
  2. Choose from two levels of participation:
    1. Basic annual membership, including the Lunch, Listen and Learn program
    2. Basic annual membership plus enrollment for the current semester in one or more seminars.
  3. You must be a member to enroll in courses and enjoy other benefits of membership. The membership fee is annual and is valid from September 1, 2020 to August 31, 2021.
  4. The flat tuition rate covers all your study groups for the semester. Space is limited in all classes, however, so enrollment is not guaranteed. (Also, a study group may be cancelled if enrollment is insufficient.) We strongly encourage you to make alternate selections in case your top choices are filled. Don’t forget to indicate the total number of study groups in which you wish to be enrolled.
  5. Registrations will be processed beginning on July 11. All applications submitted by that date will be regarded equally for purposes of assigning places in each study group. Applications may be submitted early (and this is encouraged) but they will not be acted upon before July 11. On that date, if any study group is oversubscribed, enrollment will be by lottery. Anyone not enrolled will be placed on a waiting list.
  6. Confirmations will be mailed out weekly beginning July 18. We will confirm you initially for up to two study groups, if space is available. If we are then able to enroll you in an additional selection, we will telephone you and send you a supplemental confirmation. Study group leaders will communicate any preparation necessary for the first class meeting.
  7. Additional costs. you are responsible for the cost of books and other materials. Typically, you are expected to obtain books on your own and to buy other materials from the leader in class.

3201 Creative Writing Workshop - CLOSED

In this writing group, the creative talents of the participants will be encouraged by their peers. Members are invited to write in any genre: memoir, poetry, fiction, non-fiction, essay, humor or play. Handouts will be provided to stimulate writing. Participants are given time to share their writings with classmates if they choose. Sometimes in talking about someone else’s writing, we are able to clarify our own thoughts and abilities. This is a light-hearted, supportive, welcoming group whose members enjoy writing for the fun of it.

Leader: Virginia Slep holds a BA and an MA in English, and taught high school English for 35 years before her retirement. She has been teaching this writing class at LLARC since 2008. She writes a regular column for the North Reading Transcript. Virginia has a PhD in Clinical Hypnosis, and has a private practice in Wayland.

Class Meetings: 10 Mondays, September 21 through December 7 (no classes on Yom Kippur, September 28 or Columbus/Indigenous People Day October 12), 9:15 to 10:45 a.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3204 A Close Look at Two Indian Novels in The Booker Prize List - CLOSED

Since 1969, the United Kingdom’s Booker Prize Committees have chosen a novel each year as “the best original novel written in the English language and published in the United Kingdom.” During that period, authors from myriad countries have won the award, including: Canada, New Zealand, Ireland, Australia, South Africa, United States (eligible beginning in 2014) and, of course, the UK. But perhaps most notable has been the inclusion of five Indian novelists and their works. V.S. Naipal was the first to receive this award for his novel In A Free State (1971); the most recent recipient is Aravind Adiga for his work, White Tiger (2008); Salman Rushdie, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, and Kiran Desai round out the distinguished list.

This course will study two of those novels while considering how they meet the criteria of both the “best original novel” and the demanding other standards of the Booker Prize Committees. Interviews with the authors, film adaptations, reviews of the works, and close textual reading will be central to our inquiry. The central themes that haunt these works are colonization, imperialism, and class—considerations that can be viewed objectively and, perhaps more importantly, internally by characters whose lives reflect each.

Please join me in a lively exploration of these important narratives.

Leader: Diane Proctor has been offering courses at Regis for five years. She taught writing, history, and literature at Milton Academy, Hotchkiss School, and Middlesex School.

Class Meetings: 10 Mondays, September 21 through December 7 (no classes on Yom Kippur, September 28 or Columbus/Indigenous People Day October 12), 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3205 How the Media Depicted the Struggle for Women’s Rights

This is a continuation from the spring class; new members are welcome. No previous course required. Before the first class, information and web references will be provided so that all will begin from the same point.

2020 is a year of celebration-100 years since the ratification of the 19th Amendment which granted American women the right to vote! This multimedia study group will consider the history of the continuing struggle for women’s rights in America. When does it start? Does it end? Who are the women who worked for the cause? What about the women who worked against it? Were all men against it? This story pervades every era in American History, with roots in Colonial days, influencing what the women did and how they did it, while limited by and adapting to the times. Our aim is to learn how the media has influenced this story in the telling of it, how the media is telling the story today, and how women then and now used the media to gain the vote.

Text: This is a discussion class with no written assignments. There is no required text. A booklist will be provided for optional use. Our major emphasis is on the use of printouts, internet resources (video, texts, original materials) and three films depicting the basic story.

Leader: Mary Nowak has a BA and MA in American history from Boston University. She taught American history and U.S. and world geography in Brookline. She has led several study groups for LLARC on three of her favorite subjects: women’s history, the roles of women on both sides of the Civil War, women and children in the Labor Movement, and the Japanese Internment by and within the U.S. during WWII.

Class Meetings: 10 Mondays, September 21 through December 7 (no classes on Yom Kippur, September 28 or Columbus/Indigenous People Day October 12), 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m

This class will take place virtually.

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3207 Rise of Religion in the U.S. Supreme Court - CLOSED

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” So starts our Bill of Rights. For over two centuries, those words built “a wall of separation between Church and State,” in the words of Thomas Jefferson. Recently, and through the efforts of religious groups, the U.S. Supreme Court has expanded “religious rights” into many secular areas such as health care and playgrounds. This five-session course will explore the expanding trajectory of “freedom of religion,” with special attention to school vouchers and wedding cakes.

Leader: Rachel Alpert teaches at Suffolk Law School. She has over 30 years’ experience as a lawyer. She previously led LLARC study groups on “Freedom of Speech,” “Sex, Gender, Bathrooms and the Supreme Court”, “The Regulation of Food in the U.S.,” and “James Joyce’s Ulysses”, and led “The Rise of Religion in the Supreme Court“ study group during the 2018 intersession.

Class Meetings: 5 Mondays, November 2 through December 7, 1 to 2:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3208 Jane Austen Goes to the Movies

Jane Austen’s novels have proved irresistible to film makers. This course will look at four of her novels; Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Emma, and Persuasion in both the original novel and film versions to see how, and what, changed in the transition from book to screen. Participants will watch the movie on their own, and the format will be eight one-period classes. All the movies can be rented for 30 days through Amazon Prime for $3.99 each. In addition, Sense and Sensibility appears to be available on Amazon Prime and Showtime, Pride and Prejudice is available on Starz, and Emma on HBO, although those do require subscriptions. Only Persuasion would require rental. If libraries have reopened, they may be available there. Preparation time will depend on how long it takes to read each of the books and watch the movie. List of Readings: Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Emma, and Persuasion, in any edition.

List of Readings: Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Emma, and Persuasion, in any edition.

Leader: Lois Novotny has enjoyed teaching several courses on musical topics at LLARC and looks forward to using her English literature undergraduate degree in exploring Jane Austen and the movies her books inspired.

Class Meetings: 8 Mondays, September 23 through November 30 (no classes on Yom Kippur, September 28 or Columbus/Indigenous People Day October 12), 1 to 2:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3211 Memoir; Personal Battlefields

Memoir is a hot form of literature these days largely because of its humanity which allows for vicarious empathy with lives and experiences that we know happened. There is a powerful immediacy to these tales that transcends geography and time. All of these authors are established writers whom you will enjoy reading and discussing. The class will be participant-discussion, seminar format. Please read the first 23 chapters in Catfish and Mandala for the first meeting.

List of Readings may include: Running in the Family Michael Ondaatje; Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight by Alexandra Fuller; Dreams in the Time of War by Ngugi wa Thiong’o; Daddy We Hardly Knew You by Germaine Greere; and Catfish and Mandala by Andrew Pham.

Leader: Brooks Goddard has been teaching since September 1963, at many levels in many places including many years at LLARC. Brooks had a 30+ year career at Wellesley High School where he retired at English Department Head. He has visited the home countries of the authors in this seminar. He lives in Needham where he reads, writes, gardens, and constantly cleans out his desk.

Class Meetings: 10 Tuesdays, September 22 through December 1 (no classes Nov 24th), 9:15 to 10:45 a.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3218 Strengthening Resilience

Through discussion and body, mind and spiritual practices (nutrition, exercise, meditation and qualities of gratitude, equanimity and joy) we will build and strengthen the resilience we need during these trying times. No prior knowledge needed in any of these areas, just a desire to learn and share.

Leader: Sheila Wolfson is a retired nutritionist and holistic health counselor. She has been a meditator since 1972. She was trained as a mindfulness meditation teacher and Wise Aging facilitator at the Institute for Jewish Spirituality. Sheila has been leading meditation groups for many years in various settings. She has taught her two LLARC courses, WiseAging and Mindfulness Meditation in the past.

Class Meetings: 10 Tuesdays, September 22 through December 1 (no classes Nov 24th), 9:15 to 10:45 a.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3210 E Pluribus Unum

The Constitution created 233 years ago replaced the Articles of Confederation, a system that had served its purpose after a mere 7 years. The untested Constitution presented the new states with an owners manual for representative democracy that was to last for another 73 years. But how long could this bold gamble be expected to endure? Would you have supported the plan in 1787? Did it need a Bill of Rights? Would you have wanted Massachusetts to ratify it?

This 10-week interactive course invites students to engage in a series of creative exercises by completing a workbook aimed at examining the question: does the Constitution work? We will see what the framers produced to “secure the blessings of liberty” and discuss to what extent they succeeded.

Text: Required workbook packet will be sent via USPS: $3, PDF edition is without charge.

Leader: Teacher and author Steve Lowe has devoted seven years of retirement to studying the U.S. Constitution. Since 2014 he has been enriched by sharing what he’s learned with lifelong learning students in the MetroWest.

Class Meetings: 10 Tuesdays, September 22 through December 1 (no classes Nov 24th), 9:15 to 10:45 a.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3214 Current Events - CLOSED

Are you a person who is interested in world events and likes to have a conversation about them? Do you want to have a place to share your opinions and thoughts about topics in the news? If so, we have a class for you! Through a facilitated discussion, classmates will express their ideas about recent happenings, while we listen, learn and understand the basis for their sentiments. Class members will be encouraged to present one topic of interest for discussion during the semester. At the end of each class we will talk about recent items that have occurred in the news during the previous week.

Leader: Muriel Stern Riseman is a retired high school counselor, who, while working, particularly enjoyed facilitating discussions between youth and adults. She has continued this interest by leading community support groups and currently volunteers as a mediator for a consumer assistance office. She identifies as a “news junkie” and likes to absorb as much information as she can about what is happening in the world and share her perceptions and listen to other points of view. She has facilitated current events classes at LLARC for the previous three semesters, and, for sure, we always have more news to explore!

Class Meetings: 10 Tuesdays; September 22 through December 1 (No classes November 24) 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3202 James Madison and the Constitution

We will examine the political life of James Madison and the period in American history in which he served. The course will present a broad portrait of the history and politics of our constitution. A special emphasis will be placed upon the impeachment clause of the Constitution and its relevance to today. In addition to the assigned text, handouts of additional or of contrasting views will be provided No reports will be required but active class participation will be expected and encouraged. One to two hours of readings for each class.No reports will be required, but active class participation will be encouraged and expected. One to two hours of readings for each class.

Text: James Madison by Ralph Ketchum.

Leader: Bernie Shuster earned an undergraduate degree with a major in history. He then earned an LLD degree at Boston University School of Law. He was a partner at a Boston law firm for several years. Subsequently Bernie cofounded and served as legal counsel and COO of a financial services firm. Upon retirement he became a member of a Harvard University Extension Division for Learning in Retirement where he led many courses for over 15 years. Bernie has been a member since 2005 and he has led over 30 courses at LLARC.

Class Meetings: 5 Tuesdays, September 22 through October 20, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3216 J.R.R. Tolkein's Short Works

Fairies, dragons, wizards, dwarves - these are the stuff of both medieval narrative and the genre of fantasy. Meet the man who practically single-handedly invented and popularized twentieth-century fantasy. J.R.R. Tolkien is best known for his epic Lord of the Rings novels, but he also wrote amazing short stories, poetry, essays, and short novels that infuse medieval into modern. We will read stories like “Leaf By Niggle,” “Smith of Wooten Major”; “Farmer Giles of Ham,” essays like “On Fairy Stories,” and longer works like The Hobbit, and Beren and Luthien.

Leader: Kreg Segall is Professor of English in the Department of Humanities at Regis College. He specializes in English medieval and Renaissance literature. He has previously taught courses on Shakespeare, Chaucer, and Homer for LLARC.

Class Meetings: 10 Tuesdays, September 22 through December 1 (no classes November 24th), 1 to 2:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3217 The Movies' Take on the Issues - CLOSED

This is a continuation of a course that already had three sessions in the spring. Any new members might want to catch up on what we watched, though it is not necessary in order to enjoy the rest of the course. The films already viewed were: Adolescent Rebellion: Rebel Without a Cause/Eighth Grade; Race: Nothing But a Man. I would be happy to send you the background materials and study guides on these films, if you are just joining the class for the fall.

In the remaining seven weeks of this course we will again look at what happens when the movies decide to take on serious issues. We will continue our look at race, and then divorce, homosexuality, and women’s issues, exploring how the movies present the topic and what conclusions, if any, are drawn—or that we can draw about what the movie is actually saying about the issue. Is the film an honest exploration or a “whitewash”? How does the cultural milieu of the time the film was made influence its depiction of the issue? How do race, gender, and class play into the depiction of what is at stake? How does the film’s genre (i.e. a comedy vs. drama, for example) change its depiction and its impact? How is the film an articulation of American society and its values? We will view two films on each topic, each which has a different “take” on it. Each week before we view the film I will send out background information on the issue and a guide to the film. The films will be streamed on Zoom in the first half of the class, and then we will discuss the film (on Zoom) through the lens of the questions listed above and on the study guide. The remaining topics and films we will discuss are: Race: Do the Right Thing; Divorce: Kramer vs. Kramer/An Unmarried Woman; Homosexuality: Brokeback Mountain/The Kids are All Right; Women’s Issues: Thelma and Louise/9 to 5. These titles are subject to change.

The course will run from 12:45 p.m. to approximately 3:45 p.m. Please note the time.

Leader: Ronna Frick retired after teaching high school English for over forty years, the last nine also serving as English Department Head at Wellesley High School. Having taught LLARC courses on “Jane Austen,” “The Bible as Literature,” “Comedy and Tragedy,” “Hollywood Film Genres,” “Hollywood Film Directors,” “Great Film Actors and Actresses,” and others, she looks forward to another meaningful and fun experience with other lifelong learners in this course, too.

Class Meetings: 7 Tuesdays, September 22 through November 3, 12:45 to 3:45 p.m. Please note the time.

This class will take place virtually.

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3219 Grokking Mathematics

To grok something is to have an accurate and comfortable feel for it. Most people do not expect to grok mathematics. That may be because math classes try to cover sufficient material instead of covering material sufficiently. Or it may because people try to memorize subject matter rather than grok a thought process.

"Grokking Math" slices the following ten topics from a mathematician's mind and puts them under a microscope for you. Topics include: 1. Whole Numbers: As seen by pharaohs, Romans, and theorists. 2. Algebra: First there was geometry, now algebra rules. 3. Infinity: What does it mean for two infinite sets to be the same size? Many of them are. 4. Infinities: One size does not fit all. 5. Zeno's Paradox: An abstract sleight of hand confuses us. 6. Probability: A definition and two potential surprises. 7. Last Passenger to Board: Improving on published answers to a well-known puzzle. 8. Algebra and Drug Testing: Applying Bayes Theorem to a drug testing question. 9. Computer Arithmetic: When mathematics meets electrical engineering, the result can be surprisingly abstract. And 10. Recursion: Like mirrors within mirrors.

You will leave with more questions than you started with but your ability to seek answers will be improved.

Leader: In 1970 J Adrian Zimmer obtained a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Waterloo in Canada.  He has taught math or computer science at all levels from high school through graduate school and has authored books in computer science.  His one consistent interest has been in stretching his own and other people's abilities to think things through. See more about Dr. Zimmer.

Class Meetings: 10 Wednesdays, September 23 through December 9 (No classes on Veterans Day November 11 or November 25th), 9:15 to 10:45 a.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3233 The Short Story: Good Things Come in Small Packages

What constitutes a short story? What sets it apart from a novel? A novella? This five-week course will explore the short story, examining the elements that are akin to this genre. The stories, like poetry, from different authors and time periods, reveal more with each reading. Short Stories are both challenging and thought provoking. Why did the author start where he/she did? And why end sometimes without the resolution for which we readers might wish? Join us as we try to answer those questions.

Leader: Pam Kyrka is a recently retired high school English teacher with years of experience teaching literature and writing in Lexington, Natick, and Mendon-Upton. She also writes children’s literature, including picture books and both middle grade and young adult fiction.

Class Meetings: 5 Wednesdays, September 23 through October 21, 9:15 to 10:45 a.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3222 Favorite American Artists - CLOSED

In this five-week art history course, you will have the opportunity to explore the life and works of five American artists.

Enjoy the luminous paintings of George Caleb Bingham, the Missouri artist, soldier, and politician who depicted frontier life along the Missouri River. Learn about Winslow Homer’s Civil War illustrations, enjoy his charming renderings of country life, and thrill to his dramatic marine paintings. Delight in the virtuosity of John Singer Sargent, the most acclaimed society portraitist and genre painter of the early 20th century. See how Grant Wood’s depictions of small town and rural life gave the American public an idealized vision of itself during the Great Depression. Analyze Edward Hopper’s thought-provoking pictures of human isolation within the modern city and admire his landscapes and coastal seascapes.

Many class discussions will augment slide lectures about each artist.

The study group leader will suggest brief weekly online readings on background topics. She will provide highlight handouts in each class via email.

Leader: Judith Scott was a guide at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum for over 13 years and is now a Guide Emeritus. She was a docent at Danforth Art Museum and School for 15 years. She has conducted numerous tours at both museums and taught a significant portion of the Danforth New Docent class. She was an amateur painter and a retired senior manager in the computer industry. This is her fourth LLARC course.

Class Meetings: 5 Wednesdays, September 23 through October 21, 9:15 to 10:45 a.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3220 Faith, Science, God and Nature - CLOSED

A five-week discussion seminar on the relationship between science and faith. We will discuss questions about how science can relate to the spiritual world and the deeper insights faith can offer about the sacred depths of nature. Each session will be based on an essay written by a prominent scientist on a modern scientific discovery and be followed by class discussion of its implications for a deeper understanding of creation that involves faith and spirituality. Our discussions of science will be up-to-date and rigorous, and our faith discussions will be inclusive and open to students of all faith backgrounds.

Leader: Frank Villa has a lifelong interest in the natural sciences. He is a natural teacher who finds great joy in explaining complex principles and processes and bringing the latest quests and discoveries of science to a general audience. He has developed curricula and taught courses in many settings on topics as diverse as the formation of the universe, alternative energy sources and human genetics.

Class Meetings: 5 Tuesdays, September 22 through October 20th, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3212 Ecology, Environment, Climate Change and the Future of Energy - CLOSED

Our world is being changed by human activity. Even small changes can have significant consequences. Yet, our civilization depends on reliable sources of energy and other natural resources for its survival. We’ll discuss the sources of and potential effects of these changes and study individual and cultural solutions for this dilemma that maintain lifestyle but pay homage to the important role of our fragile environmental tapestry.

Leader: Frank Villa has a lifelong interest in the natural sciences. He is a natural teacher who finds great joy in explaining complex principles and processes and bringing the latest quests and discoveries of science to a general audience. He has developed curricula and taught courses in many settings on topics as diverse as the formation of the universe, alternative energy sources and human genetics.

Class Meetings: 5 Tuesdays, October 27 through December 1, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3221 From Sea to Shining Sea: 19th Century American Imperialism - CLOSED

The United States rose from a small republic that was burned by the British (1815) to a world power after the Spanish-American War (1898) in eighty-three years. This course will examine how this young republic became an imperial world power. We will critically study the methodology used by the people and the government of the United States to accomplish this goal. Did the United States view itself as an imperial world power? Is this what you, your children, and your grandchildren were taught in school? And if not, why not? Controversy and dissent is very welcomed.

Text: Readings to be distributed

Leader: Ron Greenwald holds three graduate degrees in history and has taught history at three Greater Boston Colleges over 15 years. He teaches his courses in the Socratic method using only primary sources.

Class Meetings: 7 Wednesdays, September 23 through October 21, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3223 A Short History of Radio or Where Did My Cell Phone Come From?

This is a non-technical discussion of radio development. This course will discuss the development of radio from 1887 through 1930 with significant information on New England’s role in early radio development. We will discuss some of the people responsible for wireless development who have been lost to time.

Readings: Study Group Leader will provide handouts and recommend internet readings

Leader: Domenic Mallozzi is an electrical engineer and ham radio operator. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Rhode Island and was an engineer for 38 years for Raytheon prior to his retirement in May 2019. He led a fascinating Lunch Listen and Learn lecture in the spring of 2019.

Class Meetings: 5 Wednesdays, September 23 through October 21, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3224 How We Got to Now - CLOSED

This course is based on the acclaimed PBS series of the same name. The course will focus on the amazing stories of accidental genius, brilliant mistakes, and the visionaries—many of them obscure—who connected seemingly unrelated fields eventually leading to innovations that created our modern world. Each week for six weeks we will view a themed episode of the series followed by a discussion of its content.

Leader: Tom Hall is a retired middle school and high school principal. He is also the author of five published novels. When he is not writing or taking LLARC classes, he is playing senior softball. Tom currently serves on LLARC’s curriculum committee.

Class Meetings: 6 Wednesdays, September 23 through October 28, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3228 Hooray For Captain Spaulding: The Insane World of Julius Henry Marx AKA Groucho

Julius Henry Marx (aka Groucho) was the third son of German Jewish immigrants who insisted they were not poor… they just didn’t have any money. He had thoughts of becoming a physician, but this energetic mother led him and his four other brothers on very different path (as we shall see).

Groucho through his literary vaudeville film radio and TV careers taught us how to be irreverent. He impudently kidded the medical, legal and military professions, politics, the “Academy”, high society, and every other institution of power.

In this course we will review and discuss Groucho’s need to display this outrageous unsentimental disregard for order that in the words of Woody Allen “will be equally funny a thousand years from now.”

As in my previous courses material will be transmitted via email on a weekly basis. Thus, class members must have computer access and be to open YouTube clips, “Word” documents and PDF’s.

Class preparation time will involve a minimum of 3 hours weekly.

Required Text: Groucho: The Life and Times of Julius Henry Marx by Stefan Kanfer.

Leader: Bob Palter’s academic career at MIT, HBS, and UMass Boston as well as his 17 years of teaching activities at LLARC, BOLLI and HILR has convinced him that film has played a major role in reflecting 20th Century World history and American culture. His prior classroom research has been included in the Regis College Archives.

 Class Meetings: 10 Wednesdays, September 23 through December 9 (No classes on Veterans Day November 11 or November 25th), 1 to 4 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3226 The Invisible Forms of Manipulation - CLOSED

We are all being manipulated daily, much of which is invisible and unrecognized. Elements of manipulation are essential factors in our important decisions. Yet, it is often difficult to know that we are being manipulated, by whom, how and even if it is good for us. This course will explore the notion that manipulation is so important that we need to understand it in order to make essential personal and societal decision. We will explore a number of forms of manipulation and how they influence our choices. Among the forms to be examined will be psychological, physical, interpersonal, economic, ideological and technological. We will cover fascinating examples such as placebo elevator bottoms, consumer advertising, manipulative personalities, magic tricks, con artists, Disney World lines, lying and neurological cognitive biases. Topics will also include how politicians create their brand, how the media select what they will cover, negotiating strategies and self-manipulation. Personal examples will be solicited from class members. Discussion and interaction are important aspects of this course. Those who wish can present a 10-minute report on a topic of interest after discussion with course leader.

Readings: I will prepare a packet of weekly course readings composed of articles from the mass media, academic journals and policy papers. This will be distributed via USPS.

Leader: Trained as a sociologist, Sandy Sherizan then went bad and became a criminologist and then really bad by becoming a computer security and privacy professional. He has taught at various universities, led seminars, been interviewed by various media and given speeches on a variety of topics internationally. As an ex-president, he is active at Congregation Beth El in Sudbury. Flunking retirement, he had volunteered to teach ESL to adult immigrants and continues to serve on a patient research ethics and safety board (IRB) at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He loves teaching subjects which are important, but which are often relatively unknown and/or misunderstood.

Class Meetings: 10 Wednesdays, September 23 through December 9 (No classes on Veterans Day November 11 or November 25th), 1 to 2:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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#3229 How Jesus Became the Christian God, Part 2 - CLOSED

For anyone interested in understanding the profound effect Jesus had on the world, it’s important to realize that his actions and teachings didn’t emerge from a vacuum. Rather, they were the product of a fascinating dialogue with—and reaction to—the traditions, cultures, and historical developments of ancient Jewish beliefs. In fact, early Judaism and Jesus are two subjects so inextricably linked that one cannot arrive at a true understanding of Jesus without understanding the time in which he lived and taught. This course will explore the environment in which Jesus lived and how Judaism influenced him. Note: this class will continue in the fall 2020.

Leader: Rabbi Robert Orkand retired from the pulpit rabbinate in 2013. He served congregations in Florida, Illinois and, for 31 years prior to retirement, in Westport, CT. Since moving to Massachusetts he has taught in various adult learning settings. He is particularly interested in understanding The Bible and in comparative religion.

Class Meetings: 8 Thursdays, September 24 through November 12. 9:15 to 10:45 a.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3227 Stage IV: First Ladies of the 20th Century: Mamie Doud Eisenhower to Barbara Pierce Bush - CLOSED

Covering these 20th century first ladies will bring back memories of our younger years. We will review the 50s–90s and see how well our memories have held up over the years. As in the past, we will not only learn about the first ladies lives, but also review the history of the time of their husbands’ terms. The first ladies of the latter half of the 20th century are no longer unknowns who live in far-away Washington but have become integral parts of our lives through the power of the technology of the 20th century. The indeed have specific roles to play and are well-known in their own rights.

Texts: While it is not important that we all read the same book, it is important that a participant read information on each of the first ladies before class. There are ample sources in local libraries or there are internet sites that provide good information. I will provide the sites before the first class. In the past I have used America’s First Ladies: Power Players from Martha Washington to Michelle Obama by Rae Lindsay. This book is currently out of print but if you have it from the previous classes it will still be applicable. If you do a Google search for it you may be able to find a few copies still available at a reasonable price. We will also be utilizing Youtube videos to provide additional information so access and use of a computer is mandatory.

Leader: Mary Egan is an experienced study group leader who has developed courses dealing with the first ladies from Martha Washington through Bess Truman and the story behind the Mexican War. An educator with 34 years’ experience on the elementary and secondary level, she has nurtured a lifelong interest in history and enjoys cultivating and sharing her knowledge of the first ladies and their husbands.

Class Meetings: 9 Thursdays, September 24 through November 19, 9 to 10:45 a.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3234 Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism

The critical year for the U.S. in the early 20th Century was 1912 which changed the legacy of Theodore Roosevelt, the Progressive Party, and transformed American democracy. The friendship of former President Theodore Roosevelt and President William Howard Taft is torn when they engage in a brutal fight for the presidential nomination. This crippled the beginning of the progressive wing of the Republican Party and was the first primary campaign with candidate-centered politics with a muckraking press. This led to Democrat Woodrow Wilson being elected and changing our country's history.

Leader: Jack Miller is a retired Engineer with teaching experience in Engineering, Mathematics, Business, and LLARC history classes. Jack’s lifelong interest in American history focuses this class on Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft and the muckraking press in the beginning of our Progressive Era.

Class Meeting:s 5 Thursdays. October 29 through December 3 (No class November 26), 9:15 to 10:45 a.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3215 Early Modernism in Classical Music

Western classical instrumental music was often composed in continental Europe in the 18th century for small audiences of aristocrats. These classical forms expanded in the 19th century to a wider audience with the more expressive music of the Romantic Era led by Beethoven, Schubert and others. By the 1880s, many music compositions became even less structured and often more expressive of their national identity, other art forms and nature. This was first described as Impressionism and later into the 1920s as Modernism. We will study and listen to the music of some ten composers of this period.

Leader: Glenn Strehle has led several LLARC courses, including the five sessions of the Romantic Era in Classical Music course in 2019. He is the retired Treasurer Emeritus of MIT.

Class Meetings: 5 Thursdays, September 24 through October 22, 9:15 to 10:45 a.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3210 More Mysteries - CLOSED

We will begin and end this semester with a comparison of a mystery classic with its contemporary rendition. In between we will read a mystery set in India and one of the novels that the PBS Mystery series Vera was based on, among others. At this writing we are without the use of our libraries so participants will need to download, listen to, or purchase copies of the book.

We cover a book per week and discussion questions to start us off are emailed to participants ahead of meeting. Your own ideas and questions are encouraged.

Readings: Turn of the Screw by Henry James; Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware; Crow Trap by Ann Cleeves; Blanche on the Lam by Barbara Neely; Strangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith; Double Indemnity by James Cain; A Rising Man by Abir Mukherjee; Man With a Load of Mischief by Martha Grimes; And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie; and All Fall Down by Rachel H. Hall

Leader: Karen Mallozzi has thoroughly enjoyed leading these Mystery sessions along with other offerings; for the first time this year online due to the virus. She holds a BA from the Univ. of RI and a MA from Andover-Newton Theological School. She is an avid reader, gardener, and is active in Natick committees.

Class Meetings: 10 Thursdays, September 24 through December 3 (No classes November 26th), 1 to 2:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3230 Astronomy: From Ptolemy to Cosmology - CLOSED

This course will be an updated reprise of the course taught at LLARC three years ago. We will look primarily at questions you always wanted to know about, but will also touch topics you didn’t know you wanted to know about, and a fair number of things nobody knows about. (Without mystery, science just isn’t any fun!). We will look at the history of astronomy, its instruments and its methods. We will tour the solar system, the galaxy, and deep space as we explore the universe from beginning to end.

Leader: Jim McLaren has taught four previous courses at LLARC. He is a retired high school science teacher and department chair. Most of his teaching has focused on biology, but he has had a life-long interest in amateur astronomy.

Class Meetings: 10 Thursdays, September 24 through December 3 (No classes November 26th), 1 to 2:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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3225 Around the Art World in 80 Days - CLOSED

Throw away that mask. Hop on board your private AirRegis flight for the vacation you can’t have on your own right now. We’ll Zoom you from Weston to New Zealand, with stops in London, Amsterdam, Paris, Madrid, Florence, Saint Petersburg, Buenos Aires, Chicago and New York before arriving home ten weeks later. Each week you’ll visit one of the world’s greatest art museums. You’ll see the museum, learn about its history and, most of all, see and discuss its greatest art. Experience masterpieces from 1400 to today, genres from Realism to Contemporary, and venues from a former Parisian train station turned art palace to a mind-boggling seaside sculpture park in New Zealand. Whether you love art or want to learn more about art, grab a glass of wine, fasten your seat belt and settle in for a flight around the art world.

Leader: Steve Kendall is the retired president of an advertising and public relations agency and the leader of more than 700 tours at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum and the Danforth Museum. He is a recipient of the LLARC Bernie Shuster Award for teaching excellence. This is the 13th term he has taught at LLARC.

Class Meetings: 10 Thursdays, September 24 through December 3 (No classes November 26th), 1 to 2:30 p.m.

This class will take place virtually.

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