The Interdisciplinary Humanities program is designed to provide students with the flexibility to be self-directed in their studies. Its interdisciplinary approach allows students to experience the breadth and depth of the humanities disciplines while learning the core competencies and content that employers are currently demanding. Through this innovative program, students can tailor their major in the following areas:

  • Media, Memory, and Cultural Studies

    Students study film, television, and other mass media in a historical context and as a vehicle for cultural commentary and analysis. They will pay particular attention to how such texts tend to enact and shape nostalgia and examine their political, social, and artistic implications.

  • History and Culture

    Students explore historical and contemporary cultures from a historical and anthropological viewpoint, using written documents, oral literature, material and popular culture, and ethnographic data.

  • Politics and Global Studies

    Students are introduced to the principles of political thinking and political action; the theoretical, methodological, historical, contemporary, and policy dimensions of political science and international relations.

  • Creative and Performing Arts

    Students are offered courses in art, music, museum studies, theatre, writing, and performance that give students a broad knowledge of the application, theory, and history of the creative arts.

  • Religious and Philosophical Studies

    Students have the opportunity to consider the ultimate questions about life through the study of the sacred. In keeping with the liberal arts tradition, the courses of the program examine the religious dimension of humanity and the influence of the sacred in the formation of culture.

  • Race, Ethnicity and Diaspora Studies

    Students examine issues such as race, ethnicity, migration, and diaspora. An experiential learning component offers students the opportunity to travel abroad or to engage in projects in area hospitals, social service agencies, schools, museums and community centers.

  • Liberal Arts

    Designed to provide a broad-based liberal arts education, students are encouraged to take a range of courses from the humanities as well as the social and natural sciences.

  • Literature and Writing

    Students follow a flexible course of study that highlights literature and advanced creative and professional writing courses within the context of cultural history and global concerns.

  • Teaching the Humanities

    Secondary Education in History and English, or English and Spanish

    This option prepares students for secondary education licensure in history and English or English and Spanish. This program provides an interdisciplinary curriculum designed around the content areas required for licensure in both subject areas.

  • Teaching in the 21st Century

    Elementary and Early Childhood Education

    Students prepare for licensure in elementary or early childhood education through a balanced curriculum of courses in education, humanities, and the social and natural sciences.

Ebeny Torres

This is

Ebeny

"The Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities has fostered a home for my passions that do not simply fit into one single category. It has allowed me the flexibility and nourishment to thrive not only as a student but as a person of this world." Ebeny Torres, '18

Required Courses

Students will choose a major field of study and will work with the advisor in that field to construct the curriculum. Students must complete the following (36 credits):

  • EN 223 Rhetoric: The Art of Written Communication
  • ID 110 Exploring the Humanities
  • ID 234 Digital Scholarship
  • 24 credits (excluding courses applied to the core curriculum) in the interdisciplinary humanities as follows:
    • Students choose a primary field of study and develop a plan of study in consultation with their academic advisor based on career goals and interests.
    • At least two courses should be designated as “global.”
    • At least one course should be designated as “experiential/integrative learning.”
    • At least 18 credits must come from upper-division (300-400 level) courses.
    • The remaining 12 credits must come from at least two supporting fields.
    • At least 12 credits must be in a single field (primary field of study).
  • A capstone project/thesis