Showing [30] courses
  • SW-202

    Intro to Social Services

    This course provides an overview of the human service delivery system with an emphasis of the role of social worker in five primary areas: social welfare, mental health, criminal justice, education and health services. Social problems and the social policies that evolved to meet the needs of populations-at-risk are explored in the context of social and political forces.15/JN:Online 1/5-1/17
  • SW-303A

    Life Span Human Behavior

    This course studies individual and family development across the lifespan from a bio/psycho/social perspective. Students use critical thinking skills in evaluating and appl ying various developmental theories in work with clients. Course content inclu des material on ecological and systems theory, cognitive and behavioral theories, and psychodynamic theories. Students complete three interviews and psychosocial assessments of someone at adolescence, midlife, and later adulthood
  • SW-304A

    Communities, Orgs & Groups

    This course studies the effects of macro systems on human behavior from an ecological perspective. Course content includes material on communities, neighborhoods, and social networks; groups; and social movements. Students will draw on systems theory and empowerment theory to discuss assessment and effective practice interventions across the content areas.
  • SW-320

    Child Welfare

    This course will explore the history and mission of child welfare services in the U.S. with an emphasis on the changing role of government. Students will examine the roles and responsibilities of social workers in child welfare agencies. Classes will discuss relevant ethical, legal and policy issues. Students will learn about the concepts of risk, vulnerability and resilience in children who are in child welfare agencies. Prerequisites: SW 202 or permission from the instructor.
  • SW-325

    Social Work in Health Care

    This elective course will explore social work practice in health care settings from a bio/psycho/social/spiritual perspective. It wi ll include material on ethical dilemmas , social work values, access to health care, populations at risk, and sensitivity to div ersity. Students will explore the meaning of illness in people's lives, how patients experience disability, chronic and terminal illnesses, trauma, grief, and loss. The role of the social worker as part of an interdisciplinary team that emphasizes a strengths perspective and wellness model will be discussed. Students will learn about medical social work in a variety of health care settings, including inpatient and outpatient clinics, home care, and hospice. Students will examine their own attitudes about health and illness and grief and loss to increase their self-awareness of work in this field.
  • SW-327

    Social Policy & Social Change

    This course provides students with skills to evaluate, draft and reform social policies. Course content will cover political advocacy, community organizing strategies, ethical dilemmas in designing social policies and the legislative process. We will also explore and debate the rights and responsibilities of government, citizens, and corporations in a just and humane society. Prerequisites: SW 202 or permission of instructor. Spring 2011 -Hybrid
  • SW-330

    Theory/Practice Soc. Work I

    This course provides students with an overview of the different phases of clinical work with individuals, families, groups and larger systems: engagement, data collection, assessment and intervention and termination. Students will develop skills in interviewing, critical thinking, self-reflection. Ecological theory, the problem-solving method and a strengths perspective will be the theoretical underpinnings of the course. Prerequisite: SW 202, Co-requisite SW 303.
  • SW-331

    Theory/Practice Soc. Work II

    This course is offered as a two-hour seminar and will provide an integration of theory and practice from a generalist social work perspective. Course content will focus on a variety of intervention strategies with children, adolescents and adults. Students will develop skills in the following areas: interviewing, organizational assessment and change, community assessment and practice evaluation. Child therapy, family assessment and group therapy also will be discussed. Prerequisites: SW 202, 303, 304, 330, 410C must be taken concurrently or prior to taking this course.
  • SW-332

    Theory/Practice/PracticumSWII

    This course will provide an integration of theory and practice from a generalist social work perspective in the context of a combined experiential learning and classroom-based course. Course content will focus on a variety of strategies for client assessment, intervention, and evaluation of treatment outcome with children, adolescents, adults, families, organizations and communities. Students will develop knowledge and skills in the following areas: Theories to guide interviewing, organizational assessment and change, assessment, and practice evaluation. Child therapy, family assessment, and group therapy will be discussed.
  • SW-334

    Field Experience

    Introduces students to the subject of death, dying, bereavement, and spirituality. Includes content on the meaning of death from many different theoretical and cultural perspectives. Course will include material on life cycle approaches to death and dying, legal and moral issues, bereavement and clinical interventions. Introduces students to the subject of spirituality and social work.
  • SW-335

    Field Work I

    Field Placement is a yearlong course that is taken concurrently with SW 337 and 401. Students are placed in a variety of social work settings. Under the supervision of a MSW, students will learn the social work role in their agencies and have opportunities to work with a range of client systems. Tasks may include assessment, advocacy, case management, family work, group work and community intervention. Students will be expected to complete a total 416 hours in the field for the year. Prerequisites: SW 202, 303, 304, 330, 331, 410C Students will take SW 337 and 401 concurrently with their field placements.
  • SW-336

    Field Work II

    Field Placement is a yearlong course that is taken concurrently with SW 337 and 401. Students are placed in a variety of social work settings. Under the supervision of a MSW, students will learn the social work role in their agencies and have opportunities to work with a range of client systems. Tasks may include assessment, advocacy, case management, family work, group work and community intervention. Students will be expected to complete a total 416 hours in the field for the year. Prerequisites: SW 202, 303, 304, 330, 331, 410C Students will take SW 337 and 401 concurrently with their field placements.
  • SW-337

    Field Work Seminar

    This course is offered as a two-hour seminar and is taken concurrently with SW 335, the Field Work Placement. Classes focus on integrating social work practice in various field agencies with classroom learning. The course is designed to help students in their field placements and provide a structured environment to discuss students field experiences. Students will concentrate on developing skills required in agency work, including use of supervision, collaboration with other professionals, legal and ethical issues, case management, and documentation. Students will discuss cases that involve issues of gender, poverty, ethical dilemmas and diversity. Prerequisites: SW 202, 303, 304, 330, 331, 410C This course is taken concurrently with SW 335.
  • SW-339

    Clinical Interviewing

    Clinical Interviewing, Role-Plays, and Reflection is a social work course that will focus on strengthening and broadening social work students clinical interviewing skills. Students will practice and enhance traditional interviewing skills and will also learn non-traditional methods of assessment and intervention, such as role-playing, sculpting, and use of drama and metaphor. Prerequisites SW 202, 303, 330.
  • SW-340

    Contemporary Social Problems

    This course will provide students with knowledge about contemporary social problems from an ecological perspective. Classes will explore the ethical implications of these social problems and the role of government in setting policy. Students will develop potential strategies for addressing these problems with individuals, groups, families, and communities. Prerequisites: None. An Introduction to Social Work, Psychology, Public Health, Nursing, or Women's Studies course would be helpful. Be prepared for a rigorous 300-level course.