Programs

LLARC Study Groups At a Glance - Fall 2014

Monday
9:15AM - 10:45AM
Tuesday
9:15AM - 10:45AM
Wednesday
9:15AM - 10:45AM
Thursday
9:15AM - 10:45AM
Friday
9:15AM - 10:45AM

Creative Writing
Course Closed

Theodore Roosevelt; A Transformative Man Who Changed America
Course Closed

First Ladies; Victorian Era to the mid Twentiety Century
Course Closed

Harry Truman; The War Years 1945-1952
Course Closed

Jerusalem; One City-Three Faiths
Course Closed

Louisa May Alcott; Behind a Mask

Meet Ten Nobel Laureates in Economics (5 sessions)

Upstarts, Rogues and Visionaries
Course Closed

The Blind Man and the Elephant; India Today
Course Closed

Vagabonding; Travels Around the World

Introduction to Word

Monday
11:00AM - 12:30PM
Tuesday
11:00AM - 12:45PM
Wednesday
11:00AM - 12:45PM
Thursday
11:00AM - 12:30PM
Friday
(variable time)

Opera (last 5 sessions)

Reporting During Wartime (6 sessions)
Course Closed

What is That? Modern Art Comes to America (5 sessions)
Course Closed

Lunch, Listen and Learn

Celebrating Science

How the West was Won on Two Steel Rails and Ribbons of Water (6 sessions)

Ethics in Comparative Religions; Jewish, Catholic, Protestant and Muslim
Course Closed

Boston Baseball History (5 sessions)

Post WWI and WW II Protectorate Zones and their Postage Stamps (5 sessions)

Jane Austen, George Eliot and Charlotte Bronte

Glee Club (5 sessions)

Friday Field Trips

Monday
1:00PM - 2:30PM
Tuesday
1:00PM - 2:30PM
Wednesday
1:00PM - 2:30PM
Thursday
1:00PM - 2:30PM
 

Hablemos Español

Epidemic Diseases; Polio and AIDS

The Holocaust From 1929 through 1945 (5 sessions)

FDR
Course Closed

Essay Writing

Playreading (6 sessions)

Family Ties
Course Closed

A Moviegoer Looks at World War II: The War Film, An Instrument of Propaganda, It’s Mythology and Its Effect on American Culture (1:00-4:00)
Course Closed

Current Events

Creative Memoir Writing Workshop

Mysteries Part II; Murder Around the World
Course Closed

The 100 Greatest Artworks of the 20th Century
Course Closed

 

*Denotes a Mini Course - Please see course description for dates

General Information

Most study groups meet for 10 weeks, mini courses meet for 5 or 6 weeks. Please note the specific meeting dates given for each course. Locations of classes will be announced shortly before classes begin. Study groups are typically "led" rather than "taught"— all by volunteers. Most use a seminar format, emphasizing discussion, usually with preparatory reading. There are variables, however, such as the amount and nature of weekly preparation, the opportunity or expectation for class members to give presentations, and the extent to which material is presented by the leader. Please read descriptions carefully for these details. Also note costs for materials provided (other than texts, which students should buy independently.)

Details

Classes fill up! Apply early for best chances of getting into the study groups you want. Enrollments continue thereafter on a first-come, first-served basis.

  1. Who may join. LLARC welcomes mature men and women of all faiths and backgrounds.
  2. Register by mail using the enrollment form in this brochure, or go to our Web site for a printable enrollment form (print extras for friends!) See www.regiscollege.edu/LLARC.
  3. Choose from two levels of participation. (1) Basic annual membership, including the Lunch, Listen & Learn program; or (2) Basic annual membership plus enrollment for the current semester in one or more seminars.
  4. You must be a member to enroll in courses and enjoy other benefits of membership. The membership fee is annual and is valid from September 1, 2013 to August 31, 2014.
  5. The flat tuition rate covers all your study groups for the semester. Space is limited in all classes, however, so enrollment is not guaranteed. (Also, a study group may be cancelled if enrollment is insufficient.) We strongly encourage you to make alternate selections in case your top choices are filled. Don’t forget to indicate the total number of study groups in which you wish to be enrolled.
  6. Registrations will be processed beginning on January 8. All applications submitted by that date will be regarded equally for purposes of assigning places in each study group. Applications may be submitted early (and this is encouraged) but they will not be acted upon before July 8. On that date, if any study group is oversubscribed, enrollment will be by lottery. Anyone not enrolled will be placed on a waiting list.
  7. Confirmations will be mailed out weekly beginning January 15. We will confirm you initially for up to two study groups, if space is available. If we are then able to enroll you in an additional selection, we will telephone you and send you a supplemental confirmation. Study group leaders will communicate any preparation necessary for the first class meeting.
  8. Additional costs. you are responsible for the cost of books and other materials. Typically, you are expected to obtain books on your own and to buy other materials from the leader in class.

LLARC Study Group Course Descriptions

Fall 2014

#1801 Creative Writing

In this writing group, the creative talents of the participants will be encouraged by their peers. Members are invited to write in any genre: memoir, poetry, fiction, non-fiction, essay, humor or play. Handouts will be provided to stimulate writing. Participants are given time to share their writings with classmates if they choose. Sometimes in talking about someone else’s writing, we are able to clarify our own thoughts and abili­ties; and this group is wonderfully encouraging, supportive and safe.

Leader: The group will be facilitated by longtime teacher and Creative Writing Class participant, Virginia Slep.>

Class Meetings: Course Closed

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#2002 Theodore Roosevelt; A Man Who Transformed America

One of the few transformations in American peacetime history occurred at the turn of the 20th century during the Roosevelt presidency. At the time, the country was fixated on laissez-faire and congress was adverse to government legislation. Political arguments filled the air: isolationism vs. expansionism; government vs. trusts; labor vs. capital; conservation vs. development; nativism vs. the Open Door policy; wealth vs. the common­wealth. This president made sweeping economic and social changes by using government action to infuse the growth of America within an ethical framework. This LLARC course will examine the business practices, culture and literature of the Progressive Era. Preparation for each class will be one-to-two hours. Active participation will be encouraged.

Text: Nathan Miller, Theodore Roosevelt: A Life (Harper-Collins Publishers-Perennial 2003) pkb $17.46

Leader: Bernie Shuster earned a BA in History at UMass Amherst and an LLD at the Boston University School of Law. He first practiced law as a partner in a Boston law firm and later founded a financial services firm. He has led many courses at LLARC including The Vietnam War, Watergate, McCarthyism andrew Jackson and The Great Depression.

Class Meetings: Course Closed

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#2003 The First Ladies, Stage 2; Civil War to Mid 20th Century

The presidents’ wives of the late 19th and early 20th centuries were at an advantage: they could look back on the experiences of former first ladies for guidance in their duties as White House hostess and political partner to the president. As the age of mass communication catapulted the United States into a world power, their position, popularity and influence grew. In this course, we will begin with Mary Lincoln and progress through the mid-20th century as we expand our knowledge of the first ladies.

Research can be done online at no cost. While it is not important to all read the same book, it is important that a participant does read about each first lady before class. One suggested book is First Ladies: The Saga of the President’s Wives and Their Power, 1789-1961 by Carl Sferrazza Anthony.

Leader: Mary Egan has offered a previous course for LLARC, The Pioneer First Ladies. An educator with thirty four years teaching in elementary and secondary schools, she has nurtured a lifelong interest in history. She particularly enjoys studying and sharing her knowledge of the first ladies and their husbands.

Class Meetings: Course Closed

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#2004 Opera for Everyone!

More than any other art form, opera is meant to appeal directly to the senses. All you need are eyes, ears and a soul to appreciate opera. Advertisers love it and filmmakers use it all the time. Come and explore three of the world’s most beloved operas, sometimes called the ABCs of opera: Giuseppe Verdi’s Aida, Giacomo Puccini’s La Bohème and Georges Bizet’s Carmen. Discover Verdi’s nationalism and pleas for liberty, Puccini’s bittersweet story of jealousy and poverty and Bizet’s tragedy of obsessive love. See how music can evoke what words cannot express and discuss your expressions in the classroom. Even if you are familiar with these master­pieces, this course will give you a fresh and in-depth knowledge.

Leader: Erika Reitshamer was born and educated in Germany and is a passionate and life-long fan of opera. She has lectured for Boston area educational institutions for many years. She was active in the formation of the Boston Lyric Opera Company more than 35 years ago. Most impres­sively, for many years she has led opera tours to Germany, Austria, Italy and France. She served as vice president of the Boston Wagner Society for eight years and presented lectures, organized concerts and promoted visiting scholars. Erika will draw her listeners into a deeper appreciation of the marvels of the human voice. She illustrates her lectures with DVDs, slides and audio CDs.

Class Meetings: Five Mondays, October 27 – December 1; 11 – 12:30pm. No class on November 24.*

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#2005 What is That?! Modern Art Comes to America

One hundred years ago, the Armory Show, the most important art show in American art history, opened in New York. It introduced modern art to not only the general public but to most American artists as well. We will examine what was happening in the American art world at the time (acad­emy art, Robert Henri and the Ashcan school) in contrast to European art (post impressionists, Cubists, Picasso, Duchamp, Matisse). We will look at the show itself, reactions to it and the aftermath, including its influence on Jackson Pollack, abstractionists and other art movements that made New York City the center of the art world. The format will consist of pre­sentations by the leader and discussion. Reports will be welcomed but not required. Reading will be approximately one hour per week from The Modern Art Invasion by Elizabeth Lunday.

Text: The Modern Art Invasion by Elizabeth Lunday.

Leader: Miriam Goldman is a retired educator and amateur painter who has always loved art history. She has led this course and others in art his­tory and creative writing at Brandeis’ BOLLI.

Class Meetings: Course Closed*

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#2006 Reporting on World War II: The New Yorker Magazine

During World War II, the New Yorker magazine faced many challenges, but the most important was guarding its journalistic mission to tell “the untold story, the story behind the story, from the average citizen’s per­spective.” We will consider how the magazine’s key correspondents such as A.J. Liebling, Rebecca West, Janet Flanner and John Hersey accom­plished that goal. We will concentrate on two stories written by Hersey: “Survival: PT109,” about the encounter of Lt. John Kennedy’s squadron with a Japanese destroyer, published June 17, 1944; and “Hiroshima,” the powerful story of six survivors, published on the first anniversary of the atomic bombing, August, 1946.

Leader: Marillyn Zacharis is a graduate of DePauw University and holds a master’s degree in English from Indiana University. She was a high school teacher and a manager of a choral organization for many years. Marillyn has led several courses in literature for LLARC.

Class Meetings: Course Closed*

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#2007 ¡¡Hablemos Espanol!!

Spanish is fast becoming a second language in the U.S. This small, infor­mal class is designed to enhance speaking skills and improve grammar. It will be conducted at an intermediate rather than beginner level. We also read literature, preferably short stories and discuss their contents. There­fore it will be necessary to buy some books. In addition, a Spanish-English dictionary will be very helpful.

Leader: Aida Dudelson was born and grew up in Montevideo, Uruguay. She received a BA in liberal arts at the University of Montevideo. Shortly after moving to the United States with her family, she worked in the for­eign department of a Boston bank. She then volunteered at New England Medical Center, translating for Spanish-speaking patients. She has taught at Wellesley High School as a short- and long-term substitute and has tutored privately for the past 26 years.

Class Meetings: 10 Mondays; September 15 – December 1; 1 – 2:30pm. No class on October 13 or November 24.

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#2008 Epidemic Disease; Polio and AIDS

In this course we will review the history of polio and AIDS, epidemic dis­eases prevalent at different times in the 20th century. By studying causes, means of transmission, treatment protocols and patients’ experiences, we will acquire a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by families and the general public. We’ll also spend time on the economic, social and political impacts of these diseases. We’ll talk about ways to fund treatment, ethical issues involved in vaccine development and the use of experimental drugs and the changing view of the rights of those with dis­abilities. Individual reports by member of the class will be welcomed, but not required.

Text to be determined; approximately 50 pages per week.

Leader: Wilma Slaight has an MA and PhD in history from Case Western Reserve University. She served as archivist of Wellesley College for over thirty years. Now retired, Wilma is a volunteer with the MetroWest Humane Society and the Framingham Public Library. This is her second LLARC course.

Class Meetings: Ten Mondays; September 15 – December 1; 1 – 2:30pm. No class on October 13 or November 24.

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#2009 The Holocaust from 1929 through 1941

This course will look back on the Holocaust from Hitler’s rise in 1929 through his demise and the fall of Germany in 1945. We will use the text Facing History and Ourselves by Margot Stern Strom. There will be assign­ments from that text for each of the five weeks of class.

Leader: Jeff Epstein has taught American history for the past seventeen years with an emphasis on the Holocaust to students at the Fessenden School. Prior to teaching, he had his own diamond business in Boston. Jeff graduated from Phillips Academy, McGill University with an honors eco­nomic degree and from Columbia University with an MBA in marketing.

Class Meetings: Five Mondays; September 15 – October 20; 1 – 2:30pm. No class on October 13.*

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#2010 Harry Truman and the War Years 1945 – 1952

This course will consider the complex and controversial decisions Harry Truman made during his presidency. They include the dropping of the atom bomb on Japan, the desegregation of the Armed Forces, the 1948 election, the Korean War and the removal of General McArthur. For resources, we will refer to Truman by David McCullough and videos of PBS’s American Experience.

Leaders: Bob Willis >and Joe Lyons. Bob Willis, a veteran of the Korean War, is a graduate of Boston College with a major in chemistry. He worked for Itek Corporation and Exxon both overseas and domestically. He has facilitated several courses at BC and Regis. Joe Lyons is a WWII vet­eran, CBI Theatre. Also a BC graduate, he is a retired international sales manager of United Electric. Both Bob and Joe have led similar courses at the Boston College Lifelong Learning Institute.

Class Meetings: Course Closed

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#2011 Jerusalem: One City, Three Faiths

Using Karen Armstrong’s book, Jerusalem: One City, Three Faiths as our text, we will focus on Jerusalem from pre-Israelite times to 1967. We’ll analyze the impact each of the three major religions had on the city; the relationships among the three faiths; and the influence of other religions beyond Jerusalem. Class members will be asked to prepare one report and to spend at least two hours a week reading the text and preparing for discussion. The class will also watch videos and study the writings of resi­dents in Jerusalem, conquerors and visitors, all to enlarge our perspective of this fascinating city.

Leader: Carol Johnson Shedd has a master’s degree in religious studies from the Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge. Retired as the Director of Outreach at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard in 2001, she has since led several courses at HILR, BOLLI AND LLARC on world reli­gions, the Middle East and the Bible.

Class Meetings: Course Closed

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#2012 Family Ties

We will examine American plays and poetry for what they reveal about the American family, looking closely at relationships between couples and between parents and their children. Our play readings will include these: The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams; All my Sons by Arthur Miller; Fences by August Wilson; Stick Fly by Lydia Diamond; Other Desert Cities by Jon Robin Baitz; August, Osage County by Tracy Letts; and Brighton Beach Memoirs by Neil Simon. We may also view excerpts of movies based on those plays. Our poetry will include works by Plath, Pastan, Olds, Ramsey, Wilbur and others. Participants will provide their own texts of the plays; copies of poetry will be provided.

Leader: Ronna Frick retired after teaching high school English for forty years, during the last nine of which she served as Head of the English Department at Wellesley High School. Ronna has taught several courses at LLARC including short stories, novellas, comedy and tragedy and the Bible. She predicts that this new course will be “meaningful and fun” for the participants.

Class Meetings: Course Closed

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#2013 The Life and Times of Franklin D. Roosevelt

There are those who would place Franklin D. Roosevelt on an altar with George Washington and Abe Lincoln. However, there are others who sug­gest that he failed to do enough to redistribute the wealth of the nation and initiated programs that would allow the government to strangle liber­ty. Did he lead the country out of the great depression or did he secretly pretend to be an isolationist while intending to lead the country into war. Was he the strong leader who masterminded the victorious military cam­paigns or was he the weak appeaser who sold out Europe at Yalta which led to the cold war? Was Eleanor Roosevelt the real power behind the presidency? FDR will be the principle focus of this course but we will also examine the forces that led to the Depression and World War II. The era is rife with many interesting events and characters. We intend to explore as many of these events and characters as possible. The course is designed to routinely involve the participants in class discussion, presentations and reflections of their experiences and knowledge of the era. The course will utilize a text, DVD’s and other visual aids

Leader: Bill Brady has a BS from Boston College, an MSPH from the University of Massachusetts and a DDS from the University of Maryland. He is an avid skier, golfer and, since retirement from dentistry in 2000, a history buff. He has been a member of the BCILR and LLARC for the past 11 years.

Class Meetings: Course Closed

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#2014 Creative Essay Writing

The essay serves many purposes: it persuades, tells stories, and invites the exploration of ideas. In studying published essays, along with sonnets and other creative fiction, this class will embark on an adventure: the creative exploration of language. Experienced writers and beginners are welcome. By writing personal essays, you can discover the transformation of your personal writing skills. Join us on this exciting journey.

Leader: Diane Proctor practices what she preaches. She has been a writer and a teacher of writing throughout her professional life. She has taught at Milton Academy, the Hotchkiss School, and the Middlesex School. Her intel­lectual focus has rested on her writing and critical reading.

Class Meetings: Ten Tuesdays, September 16 – December 2; 1 – 2:30pm. No class on November 11 or November 25.

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#2015 Play Reading

Enter the exciting world of Drama! We will explore/dissect some of the greatest plays ever written. From Aristophanes to Albee, come feel the emotions of fear, anger, revenge, hope and love. This six-week course will focus on three plays. Plays to be announced before the first session.

Leader: John Archer is a trained singer, actor, musician and veteran of straight and musical theater productions for many different companies in New England. John runs a business in Beverly and is an active civic leader and philanthropist for several arts organizations. He has led play read­ing courses at North Shore community venues and study groups for LLARC since 2005.

Class Meetings: Six Tuesdays; September 16 – October 21; 1 – 2:30pm.*

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#2016 Upstarts, Rogues & Visionaries: Women in Victorian America Who Broke the Rules, Defied the Odds, Made the Headlines and Lived Their Truths

When we think of Victorian women, we tend to think immediately of gen­teel beauties constrained by corsets and culture… but there were women who broke free of those bonds and dared to live their truths! Some were virtuous, some were infamous… and all were scandalous. In this course we will study the lives and times of familiar figures such as Annie Oakley, Mother Jones and Lizzie Borden… and we will discover other iconoclasts such as Carrie Nation, Belle Starr and “The Scarlet Sisters.”

The study course will consist of handouts, internet readings, voluntary reports and discussion. Cost of Materials: $10

Leader: Mary Nowak has a BA and an MA in American History from Boston University and was a teacher of American history and US and world geog­raphy in Brookline. She has a special interest in women’s history and the Civil War and has led several study groups for LLARC.

Class Meetings: Course Closed

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#2017 Behind the Mask of Louisa May Alcott

Was Alcott a genteel writer of children’s books? So it seems. A high-spir­ited daughter in a tightly knit family? Probably. An author who sold her pulp fiction to support her impoverished family? Yes, it’s true. Alcott lived at the center of social change in mid-19th century Boston, surrounded by some of the most famous reformers of her day. Yet behind the scenes, her early years were marked by abject poverty and it was left to Louisa to support her family however she could. She turned her life into fiction and her fiction into money. Learn more about her personal struggles and her work, within the context of her times. Discover the real Louise May Alcott behind the mask.

Readings: Marmee and Louisa by Eve LaPlante, Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Leader: Ann Berman, a retired middle and high school special education teacher, has a private after-school tutoring business. She will figure out a way to connect all of this to her passion, Shakespeare. Diane Burkhardt is a retired middle school teacher. An enthusiastic LL student, this is her first time leading a course at LLARC.

Class Meetings: Ten Wednesdays, September 17 – November 19; 9:15 – 10:45am.

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#2018 Ten Nobel Laureates in Economics

The Nobel Prize in Economics was first presented in 1969. Some of the winners have been honored for their research in understanding the eco­nomic behavior of the markets for goods, services and investments. I have selected ten of those Nobel Laureates. We will zero in on their research findings on financial markets, the behavior of investors and the applica­tion to investment portfolios. We will combine our class discussion with internet videos of archived talks by the ten laureates and with related texts. Course participants will need access to a computer with video capa­bility and should expect to spend two to four hours a week in preparing for class.

Leader: During his tenure as MIT Treasurer, Glenn Strehle met frequently with economics faculty members who were Nobel honorees. Those meet­ings as well as his personal investment experience have increased his appreciation for the important work of the Nobel Prize winners.

Class Meetings: Five Wednesdays, September 17 – October 15; 9:15 – 10:45am.*

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#2019 Celebrating Science

Science is an important tool of society. We humans are faced with poten­tially world-changing decisions resulting from advances in science and technology. We’ll tackle a different topic every week and try to shed light on issues ranging from climate change to genetics to stem cell therapy. In a series of lectures, this course will help us make sense of the competing voices that vie for our attention. Join us. Our discussions on the most up-to-date science will be clear, concise, thought-provoking and fun.

Leader: Frank Villa has a lifelong interest in the natural sciences. He is a natural teacher who finds great joy in explaining complex principles and processes and bringing the latest quests and discoveries of science to a general audience. He has developed curricula and taught courses in many settings on topics as diverse as the formation of the universe, alternative energy sources and human genetics.

Class Meetings: Eight Wednesdays, October 1 – November 19; 11am – 12:30pm.*

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#2020 The Real Truth About How the West was Won

Whoever thought that fiction is more exciting than fact is wrong. Let’s look at the development of the West from 1850 to the early 20th century. There were real shoot-ups involving private railroad armies, the U.S. Army and Native Americans. There were long court cases, political intrigue and government scandals. There were the Harvey Girls, who opened the doors of the western workplace to women. This course will glance at those events, while focusing on the role that the railroad and canals played in civilizing the West. The class will also have a chance to visit one of the largest model railroad layouts in our area to see how the railroads con­quered the physical barriers inherent in going west.

Leader: Norm Weizer received a BA in Physics and an MSE in Computer and Information Sciences from the University of Pennsylvania. He spent forty years in the computer industry. Since retiring, he has taken part in lifelong learning programs at Brandeis and Regis as a frequent study group leader and curriculum committee member. A student of the history of railroads and railroading for many years, Norm is an avid model railroader himself.

Class Meetings: Six Wednesdays. September 17 – October 22; 11am – 12:30pm.*

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#2021 The Evolution of Religious Ethics

This course will explore the origination, the founders and the evolution of ethics in several religions. A representative of the Jewish, Catholic, Protestant and Muslim faith will each attend a class session and present the subject in their religion. The class will discuss the materials presented and in provided handouts the following session. The final session will be a panel discussion with the four religious representatives. Preparation time: one to two hours a week; oral reports are encouraged but not required.

Leaders: he course will be facilitated by Richard Lucas and Jill Rosen. Richard is a long time attendee of lifelong learning courses at Brandeis and LLARC, participating as class, council and curriculum committee member. He graduated from Mass. Maritime Academy as a marine engi­neer and from the BU School of Management. Jill is the director of LLARC.

Class Meetings: Course Closed

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#2022 A Moviegoer Looks at World War II — The War Film: an Instrument of Propaganda: Its Mythology; Its Effect On American Culture

World War II, “The War to Save Democracy,” inspired documentaries and films that continue to be studied, reinterpreted and debated. Those films depicted a strong, united America, a mythic America in which the average person took on the status of heroes and heroines, warriors and goddesses. This class will examine the historical accuracy of these films, drawing a contrast between the events as they occurred and Hollywood’s treatment of those events. Viewing films such as Bataan, Air Force, Sahara, Purple Heart, 12 O’clock High and They were Expendable, we will uncover the interference and influence of government agencies on Hollywood produc­tions.

Class preparation, including reading and viewing, will take three to four hours a week. Assignments will consist of the text, critics’ reviews and other materials that the study group leader will distribute weekly by email and internet links. Computer access to Word, PDF documents and YouTube are required. Everyone will be expected to present a question or comment based on the weekly assignment and will be expected to contribute to the discussion after viewing the film in class. This class is designed for the serious student who has a strong interest in film as an art form that also serves as an instrument of propaganda affecting American culture. Estimated reading and preparation time will take between 3 – 4 hours per week.

Leader: Bob Palter Bob Palter holds academic degrees from MIT, Harvard Business School and UMassBoston where he concentrated on 20th century American history. Bob has led courses at Brandeis, Harvard and LLARC for the last five years.

Class Meetings: Course Closed

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#2023 Current Events

The purpose of this course is to discuss current issues. The subjects are entirely up to the participants and the class will be asked to bring at least one subject to class each week. In addition, each member will be invited to make a 10 minute presentation on a subject of their choosing once dur­ing the semester. Each week an article for discussion will be emailed to each member. In order to give everyone an opportunity to speak, remarks will be limited to several minutes per person.

Leader: Peter Taylor is a retired civil engineer. He was an adjunct pro­fessor at Brown University for 15 years and in 2012 he was a facilitator for current events at LLARC. He and his wife Joan spend about 4 months trav­eling in their RV each year.

Class Meetings: Ten Wednesdays; September 17 – November 19, 1 – 2:30pm

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#2024 Vagabonding

One of the great thrills of travelling is the planning: guide books, friend’s tips, inspirations, finding the perfect view, bargaining for that nifty wal­let. So many places, so little time. And if you don’t go, someone else might and will be thankful for your suggestions. The idea behind this offering is to create a travel guide of practical information for a two-week trip to any “manageable” location in the world with as many of the following sites as possible: a grand city (for 3+ nights), a major histori­cal or archeological site, one shopping experience, one food experience, one “spiritual” (not necessarily religious) experience and one transporta­tion experience. Each participant must prepare one travel guide for each member of the class and you can work with another person on both (if you are adamant about not preparing a guide, you can then prepare food delights for the appropriate day). You can have been to the place you recommend, but ???????. Your travel guide will be presented to the class. Ideally, there will be a 20-minute presentation followed by questions for 20 minutes, two per session. Visuals would be a great addition.

Leader: Brooks Goddard is a lifelong learner and teacher with a career at Wellesley High School. He has taught numerous courses at LLARC in both literature and history, the very picture of a liberal arts education.

Class Meetings: Ten Thursdays, September 18 – December 4; 9:15 – 10:45am. No class on September 25 or November 27.

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#2025 India: The Blind Man and The Elephant

This course will offer a glimpse into the culture of modern India. We will explore its politics; its changing attitudes towards gender and sexual taboos; its massive slums in stark contrast to its growing middle class. We will learn about the internal effects of the outsourcing of American com­panies to India and consequent migration of Indians to the U.S. We will have fun looking at the “Bollywood” film industry and then travel south to the spice areas to find out why Indian cuisine is so unique. Unlike the seven blind men in the Indian fable who feel the elephant from differ­ent locations, one at the trunk, one at the tail and so have very different takes on the animal, we, on the other hand, will try to come up with a sense of the whole. My main objective is to offer a new and varied per­spective on a fascinating country, one that is growing and changing at an amazing pace.

Leader: A native of Los Angeles, Nan Feldon brought to the East Coast her passionate love of film and books and a mind and heart open to diver­sity. She also brought with her a BA in English and a lifelong secondary teaching credential from UCLA. She has taught high school in inner city LA and in Newton, MA. All her life she has facilitated learning and has led four courses at LLARC.

Class Meetings: Course Closed

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#2026 Jane Austen, George Eliot and Charlotte Brontë

Unassuming as these three 19th century British authors may have been in their time, they remain famous among literary scholars to this day. Their legacy includes some of the best novels ever written. On the first day of class, I will introduce the historical period and begin our study of Pride and Prejudice. Class members should read the first half of the novel for the first class.

Readings: Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice and Mansfield Park; Charlotte Brontë, Villette; and George Eliot’s Mills on the Floss and Middlemarch.

Leader: Ann Sibley has a BA and MA in English and American Literature from Boston College where she has also taught. Ann has led several cours­es at BCILR and LLARC.

Class Meetings Ten Thursdays, September 18 – December 4; 11 – 12:30pm. No class on September 25 or November 27.

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#2027 Boston Baseball History 1871 – 2013

This course will tell the story of Boston baseball history from the very first game of the Boston Red Stockings to the last Sox game played in ’13. Herb Crehan will be focusing on “the magic and the tragic” for the Red Sox and the Braves: the origins of baseball, the formation of the Boston Americans, the Yawkey Era, the one-team city, the impact of free agency, the successes of the baseball icons, the John Henry group and the world championship seasons. He will also address the cultural and economic forces in the region that influence baseball fans and ball clubs. The class will also enjoy PowerPoint slides of historic photographs.

Leader: Herb Crehan constantly upgrades his baseball courses, with sev­eral interviews with the players every season. He has interviewed almost every notable former Red Sox player since Bobby Doerr who joined the team in 1937. Sharing memories of these relationships with the pros will add immeasurable pleasure to the class’s study of our national pastime. Now semi-retired, Herb has taught a course on the graduate level at Brandeis and was an adjunct member of the faculty of Bentley University for seven years.

Class Meetings: Five Thursdays, September 18 – October 23; 11 – 12:30pm. No class on September 25.*

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#2028 Post-World War I and Post-World War II; Protectorate Zones and Postage Stamps

We will explore how the winning countries administered their protector­ate zones in Europe after both World Wars, scrutinizing the relationships between the administrators of the winning countries and the local politi­cal leaders. We will also take note of how postage stamps record impor­tant local sites, building and military zone administrative functionaries. We’ll learn about initial overprints for use in the European protectorate zones and later, locally printed postage stamps signaling new currencies and new military and political leaders.

Leader: Jacob Miller is a retired engineer with teaching experience in engineering, mathematics and business. His stamp collecting turned from general worldwide to a more focused subject: protectorate zones in Europe after the wars. He is particularly interested in regional governance and the creation or re-creation of independent states.

Class Meetings: Five Thursdays, October 30 – December 4; 11 – 12:30pm. No class on November 27.*

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#2029 LLARC Glee Club Sings Broadway

This choral group includes all levels. Reading music is not necessary. Auditions only for soloists. Everyone is welcome. The five sessions begin with vocalizing. We will then learn a repertoire taken from the stages of the Broadway theatre.

According to an article titled “Group Singing, Well-Being and Health: A Systematic Mapping of Research Evidence,” published in the University of Melbourne Referenced E-Journal, October 2010, there are indications that singing can help to promote a sense of personal and social well-being and that it may be effective in promoting physical health.

Leaders: The group is led by experienced musicians who are conservatory trained. The conductor is Barbara Brilliant and the accompanying pianist is Willa Trevens.

Class Meetings: Five Thursdays; September 11 – October 16; 11am – 12:30pm. Note early start date.

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#2030 Creative Memoir Writing Workshop

During our ten week creative writing course, we will write approximately eight personal vignettes in narrative, poetic or essay form. Participants, whether beginning or more experienced, will be writing in a supportive environment where it’s safe to tell our stories. Some students will be seeking the structure of the group setting as opposed to a solitary envi­ronment. In our class we will provide incentives and innovative prompts to stimulate recall of our earlier lives, assisting our writing at home or in class. We will read our work to each other and have the opportunity to develop supportive critiquing skills, thereby providing the feedback all writers look forward to, as well as require for their own progress. There will be a $5 fee for handouts. Class limited to 10 participants.

Leader: Mimi Aarens has been facilitating creative memoir workshops for more than ten years, with groups at Boston College and Tufts University Life Long Learning Centers, in addition to senior and local adult education centers and the Rowe Conference Center in western Massachusetts.

Class Meetings: Ten Thursdays; September 18 – December 4; 1 – 2:30pm. No class on September 25 or November 27.

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#2031 Mysteries Part II

First, we will look at the golden age of mystery writers and then travel around the world reading stories set in Canada, Asia, Europe, Australia and South Africa. We will come close to the end of our journey in California but actually put on the breaks in “future earth.” The instructor suggests reading ahead. Please email her for the book list at kmallozzi@ aol.com.

Leader: Karen Mallozzi has a BA from the University of Rhode Island and an MA in religious studies from Andover-Newton Theological School. She is the Coordinator of Parish Ministries at St. Bridget’s in Framingham. An avid reader, she has facilitated reading groups on fiction, non-fiction, theological subjects and once again, whodunits!

Class Meetings: Course Closed

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#2032 The 100 Greatest Artworks of the 20th Century

Some are beloved, some are confusing. Some are beautiful, some are troubling. But every one of the 100 greatest artworks of the 20th century will cause you to take plenty of notice, to question and to form an opin­ion. Each week, the genius behind various artworks and their artists — from Picasso and his Guernica, to Pollock and his Autumn Rhythm — will be revealed. You will learn the elements of great art and how to look at 20th century art, from surrealism to realism to pop art and more. All the while, the class will discuss what excites them, or bothers them, about a painting, a sculpture, photograph or installation. “What do you see?” will be the calling card of the class. In week seven, you’ll take part in a highly participative tour of the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum so you can begin to appreciate contemporary art in new ways.

Leader: Steve Kendall is the retired president of an advertising and pub­lic relations agency; the mentor of women and teens who are starting businesses; a trainer of art museum tour guides; and the leader of more than 250 tours at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum and the Danforth Museum. His tours are inquiry-based, eliciting the responses of visitors as they view art in more depth than ever before.

Class Meetings: Course Closed

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#2033 Introductory Word

Students will learn to use Microsoft Word 2007 as a word processing tool and to create professional looking documents as well as creative pieces on their personal laptops. Students must have their own laptop with Windows and Office 2007 installed and bring a flash drive. Participants will learn how to open, close, save a file and how to enter, edit, copy and paste text. They will build on these skills and become proficient through in-class group exercises and individual practice.

Leader: Donna Papapietro has been an educator/trainer for over 20 years and is currently the principal of Independent Instructional Design and Educational Services. She has taught Introductory Word, Introductory PowerPoint and Intermediate Word and PowerPoint for LLARC with great success.

Class Meetings: Six Fridays; September 19 – October 24; 9:15 – 10:45am.*

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Friday Field Trips

Times and Dates Vary

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Lifelong Learning

781-768-7135

Free LLARC parking behind the Fine Arts Center

Participation in LLARC

Membership

Enjoy all the Benefits of Membership
• $75 per year

Semester Enrollment

Enroll in one or more Study Groups in addition to enjoying all of the basic benefits of membership
• $175 semester tuition
  (in addition to the prerequisite
  annual membership fee)

Regis College Lifelong Learning: Programs
Programs, lifelong learning, study, schedule
Lifelong Learning program schedule